Events > Public Meeting: Right To Work is WRONG for Ohio – Monday, 5.21.18

Public Meeting: Right To Work is WRONG for Ohio


‘Right To Work’
is Wrong for Ohio

Public Meeting: Monday, May 21, 2018 | 3:30 PM-4:30 PM
UAW Local 913 Union Hall,
3114 Hayes Avenue, Sandusky 44870

Learn about the negative impact of RTW
and what it could actually mean for you.

Remember SB5 in 2011? What is happening in Ohio now?

Ohio Republican legislators have proposed a package of six separate constitutional amendments that would limit how unions are funded, ban project labor agreements where the state or cities require union labor for construction projects, and eliminate prevailing wage, which sets a floor wage for skilled labor
on publicly funded projects.

What is happening on the National stage?
Bill H.R.785 – National Right-to-Work Act 

Speakers:
John Haseley
Former Chief of Staff for Governor Ted Strickland.
Head of We Are Ohio, which coordinates with all Labor Unions
and other groups around Ohio in the FIGHT AGAINST ‘Right to Work’!

Chris Maxie
Ohio AFL-CIO Central Labor Council -
Greater Northwest Area Campaign Coordinator. 
Ohio native who worked with Working America, 
an organization started by the AFL-CIO to build support among non-union voters.


If additional questions, please contact Deb Nickoloff – dnickoloff@bex.net or 419.433.3433


To print out flyer to share with others, please visit here.


Additional information:

H.R. 785 National Right-to-Work Act, 115 Congress (2017-2018)

This bill amends the National Labor Relations Act and the Railway Labor Act to repeal those provisions that permit employers or labor organizations, pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement that is a union security agreement, to require employees to join a union as a condition of employment (including provisions permitting railroad carriers to require, pursuant to such an agreement, payroll deduction of union dues or fees as a condition of employment).

Ohio Right to Work legislation

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Supporters of "right to work" legislation are taking a different route to enact changes critics say would unnecessarily weaken unions in Ohio.

Ohio Republicans have shied away from advancing right to work bills after voters overwhelmingly voted in 2011 to repeal the controversial law Senate Bill 5, which would have limited collective bargaining among public sector employee unions.

Instead of a state law, a pair of Republican legislators want to put right to work language and other union-related provisions in the state constitution -- if Ohio voters approve.

Reps. John Becker and Craig Riedel have proposed a package of six separate constitutional amendments that would limit how unions are funded, ban project labor agreements where the state or cities require union labor for construction projects and eliminate prevailing wage, which sets a floor wage for skilled labor on publicly funded projects.

Riedel said a lot of Ohioans felt Senate Bill 5 was rammed down their throats, and he and Becker are taking a totally different approach.

"We're not legislating any bills here," Riedel, a Defiance Republican, said in a Tuesday news conference. "We're bringing this to the ballot and we want the citizens of Ohio to vote on this so once and for all, we'll get this settled."

When would it be on the ballot?

Becker and Riedel want to see the proposals on the November 2020 ballot because turnout is higher in presidential election years. Riedel said it will take time to educate voters about the issues, and they want as many Ohioans as possible to weigh in.

Becker said there is some concern that the issues could drive Democrats to the polls and thus boost a Democratic presidential candidate. But he said the issues could also increase turnout among Republicans who might not otherwise vote.

What are they proposing?

Employees already cannot be required to join unions. But state law allows collective bargaining agreements to require "fair share" or agency fees. The fees are lower than union member dues payments and cannot be used for services beyond contract negotiations.

Twenty-eight states have passed "right to work" laws banning mandatory union membership or fair share dues, including neighboring Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky and West Virginia.

Their proposed constitutional amendments:

Private-sector right-to-work: Eliminates requirement employees pay fair share dues. Employees would have to opt in to pay dues.

Public-sector right-to-work: Eliminates fair share dues for public sector unions.